REDO Training Course Offerings 2012

The Research and Extension for Development Office (REDO) is one of the academic units of the UP-CSWCD.  Specifically, REDO’s functions include (1) theory-building as support to academe; (2) capability building as support to people’s movement and/or social change through training of community leaders and development professionals; and (3) advocacy and networking to influence policies and programs in relation to social development endeavors.

As an extension arm of the College, REDO conducts training programs for development workers and community leaders in the areas of social development. Below are the training courses to be offered for 2012.

Enhancing Mentoring, the Supervisor’s Educational Function
The three day, live-out training aims to enhance the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of middle level supervisors in providing the needed support to improve the functioning of the supervisees. The focus is on making them proactive in intervening when there are performance gaps among the supervisees and systematically and purposively providing opportunities for their growth in their work.

Mentoring is an important task of the supervisor. However, his/her administrative responsibilities usually take precedence over upgrading the supervisee’s performance. Coaching is guiding and instructing an employee on how to do a job so that it satisfies performance goals. On the other hand, mentoring is providing guidance, advice, and encouragement through an ongoing one-on-one work relationship (Samuel Certo, Supervision, 2006)

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Date: 8-10 February 2012
Fee: Php 7,500.00
Contact Person: Dr. Leticia S. Tojos /Mabel Orleans/Mary Antonnette F. de Leon
Venue: Bulwagang Tandang Sora (BTS), UP-CSWCD

Gender Responsive Planning

Date: 16-18 May 2012
Fee: Php 7,500.00
Contact Person: Leah B. Angeles/Mabel Orleans/Catharine Adaro
Venue: Bulwagang Tandang Sora (BTS), UP-CSWCD

Community Organizing Amidst Evolving Concerns in Social Development

This course aims to provide the participants with an overview of the concepts, processes, and approaches in organizing work in the context of Philippine reality. In-depth analysis of case studies on the emerging trends in social movements such as involvement of people’s organizations’ leaders in local and national governance, gender mainstreaming and the integration of disaster risk reduction and management in organizing will be presented. The course seeks to enhance the organizing skills of the participants that will aid them in preparing a re-entry plan with their respective organizations.

Dates: 26-29 June 2012
Fee: Php 10, 000.00
Contact Person: Celeste F. Vallejos/Mabel Orleans/Mary Antonnette F. de Leon
Venue: Bulwagang Tandang Sora (BTS), UP-CSWCD

Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation of Social Development Projects
People can only claim ownership of community development projects if they have participated meaningfully in its development and management. The three-day, live-out seminar workshop in Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation aims to equip social development practitioners with knowledge and skills to strengthen people’s involvement, enhance their capacities and increase their confidence in the decision making processes, thereby, sustaining development projects. Further, the training course aims to enhance the understanding and capabilities of participants in developing appropriate participatory monitoring and evaluation systems for their respective community projects and programs.

The training program is intended for Program/Project Managers, Development Planners, Program/Project Evaluators/Analysts, Community Organizers, Community Development Workers, Social Workers, other Social Development Practitioners, Social Researchers and Social Science Graduate Students who are into projects in agriculture, environment, housing, health, education, livelihood, disaster preparedness, infrastructure or any programs and services involving poor or vulnerable groups like farmers, informal settlers, children, women, the elderly and people with disabilities, among others.

Dates: 14-17 August 2012
Fee: Php 10, 000.00
Contact Person: Leah B. Angeles/Mabel Orleans/Catharine Adaro
Venue: Bulwagang Tandang Sora (BTS), UP-CSWCD

Gender Responsive Case Management
Case management is a vital element of competent social work practice. It is the process of providing services whereby a professional social worker collaboratively assesses the needs of the client and the client’s family, when appropriate, and arranges, coordinates, monitors, evaluates, and advocates for a package of multiple services to meet the specific client’s complex needs.

The Social Work Case Gender Sensitive Case Management Training course is designed to improve the social workers’ capacity as case managers in delivering unique and quality service to client groups. It will focus on improving the skills, knowledge and attitude of case managers in helping clients using rights-based, gender sensitive and responsive approaches, and strengths perspective. It will also be a venue for practitioners to share, reflect and learn from each other’s experiences as case managers and to locate social work case management in an interdisciplinary practice of helping.

Date: 5-7 September 2012
Fee: Php 7, 500.00
Contact Person: Josefina Rolle/ Celeste F. Vallejos/Mabel Orleans
Venue: Bulwagang Tandang Sora (BTS), UP-CSWCD

Training on Inclusive Planning for Local Development Planners
Focused on Older Persons (OPs) and Persons with Disabilities (PWDs)
The three day, live-out training seeks to build the awareness, knowledge, and skills of local government executives, planning officers, local social welfare officers, educators, health workers, PWD and OP representatives in including the needs, entitlements, and capacities of the vulnerable sectors, particularly the OPs and the PWDs, in development planning.

The inclusive approach to development planning is an alternative paradigm in assisting the vulnerable sectors particularly the older persons (OPs) and persons with disability (PWDs) by integrating their specific issues and recognizing their rights and potentials in mainstream policies, programs and services. This perspective is drawn from the State’s mandate of its responsibility to create a safe environment where its citizens can live full, satisfying lives. Everyone has the right to assert his/her entitlements which the State must provide.

Date: 21-23 November 2012
Fee: Php 7, 500.00
Contact Person: Dr. Leticia S. Tojos/Mabel Orleans
Venue: Bulwagang Tandang Sora (BTS), UP-CSWCD

For interested participants, please fax the following information to(632) 9242143 or (632) 9298438 or email them to redo.cswcd@up.edu.ph
Name
Position
Organization
Address
Tel & Cellphone Nos.
Email Address

A non-refundable reservation fee of Php 1,500.00, deductible from the full payment of registration, is required. The registration fee is inclusive of the cost of training materials, food (2 snacks &lunch daily) and training certificate.

For further inquiries, please get in touch with the contact person/s of the respective training course as previously indicated at the following numbers: (632) 981-8500 local 4107 or (632) 9242143.

Continuing Advocacy for Inclusion

The “Training on Inclusive Planning for Local Development Planners: Focused on Older Persons and Persons with Disabilities” was conducted by the Research and Extension for Development Office (REDO) from October 19-21, 2011 at the CSWCD Audiovisual Room.  It was a trail blazing effort, a new training course offered by the Office which took cognizance of the invisibility of these sectors in the life of their localities.  There is thus a need to open the eyes of local executives to the importance of enhancing their wellbeing and status in so
ciety by addressing their specific concerns.  This is an advocacy which REDO has taken on.

As indicated by the participants’ responses, the activity was a success in that it gave them greater appreciation of what inclusive planning is. Moreover, it provided them with the needed knowledge and skills to plan programs and projects, monitor their implementation through the use of the various tools presented during the sessions.The participants acknowledged the importance of the training and suggested that this be offered on a continuing basis.  Also, as part of its advocacy effort, the Office should be proactive in proposing the said course to city and municipal councils to awaken them about the importance of the inclusive approach.

Tandang Sora @ 200 Call for Abstracts

Women and Development Studies Graduates Speak cont’d

SCHEREE  HERRERA
MAWD 2007
Works at UNFPA-Masbate

A course in Sociology triggered my interest to pursue a Master’s degree in Women and Development Studies. I needed an intervention. I needed a fresh perspective. I wanted to empower myself as a woman. I wanted to transform this society. I wanted to become an effective development worker. I started spreading my “gender virus” in all my career engagements – in research, in policy/legislation, in development programming and in fieldwork. I am one of the privileged products of the DWDS.

ABBIE NICOLE WILLIS, USA
MAWD 2009

I love the education I pursued at the DWDS. Before I enrolled, I had only limited exposure to feminist and development theory; throughout the program, my theories and ideas expanded. I was able to interact with women, communities, classmates and professors in ways I would never have imagined. Many of the frameworks I learned in the program strongly influence my work. Currently, I work with a small, international foundation. We are in the process of new project development, and I am able to bring the concern of women to the center of these projects. As I express these concerns, I am able to propose pathways towards empowerment with an expansive understanding of issues women face in communities. I attribute much of this understanding to what I learned at the DWDS.

Atty. ELAINE MAY P. HERNANDEZ
MAWD 2010

My degree in WD Studies helps me immensely in my work as a practicing lawyer. The feminist and development perspectives inform my practice especially in handling cases involving gender and women’s issues. Further, the networks and linkages that I have developed in and out of the Department have significantly broadened my horizons for my professional work, as well as my advocacies. Most importantly though, the friendships, sisterhood and supportive and nurturing environment in the Department proved to be life-transforming.

ACCEPTED APPLICANTS FOR 2nd SEMESTER 2011-12

BSCD

1. BUHAT, JOHN PERRY

2.QUIJANO, JOHN CARLOS

BSSW

1.MANUEL, JOSE ANGELO

MCD/DIP. CD

1.CABALLA, MARGARITA VICTORIA

2. CONCEPCION, FLORINDA

3.CRUZ, ROSE ANN

4. DELA CRUZ, ARVEN

5. DUMA, DANIEL

6. GARINGAN, EDEL

7. MALLARI, ROSALIE

8.QUILOY, ADRIANN

9.REAMICO, CHRISTIE

10.RIOVEROS, MELISSA

11.YONEZU, EISUKE

12. ZUNIGA, ANTHONY ROSS

MSW

1. GONZALES, SAYNA

2. FELICISIMO, FLORINOR

3. MACALAGAY, DANILO JR.

MAWD

1. JALANDONI, MA. CECILE ANGELA

2. VICEDO, KRISTINE MAE

DSD

1. PETEROS, CAROLIZA

2. REYES-CARAMBAS, MELANIE

3. LEE CONG VAN

FOR INTERVIEW
NOVEMBER 2/3, 2011

1.BONAFUS,CRISTELA DIANNE
2.GABRIENTO, MIGUEL IAN
3.MENDOZA, ARCHIE JON

Women and Development Studies Graduates Speak

LOREN UMALI
MAWD 2000
Deputy Executive Director, Philippine Commission on Women

A milestone has been achieved — proud to finish my MAWD in 2000
A path has begun – now a member of the management committee of the Philippine Commission on Women Dreams are shining as the sun — have expanded my local and international network and guided a lot of local government units, agencies and countries in Gender Advocacy A Victory is won — have helped save women’s lives with sharpness in arguing I gained from the CSWCD. Imagine it, you win it — enroll in MAWD, my best investment!

HEATHER HURWITZ, USA

MAWD 2002

I came to the MAWD program because it is the only women and development program of its kind in Asia at the top University in the Philippines. I continue to praise the program because it is unique around the world, as the most genuine and rigorous fieldwork-based-approach to professional development work training, particularly on women/gender/feminist issues. I will always be inspired by the incredible friends and mentors, and the creative resistances of women throughout the Philippines that I experienced through the MAWD program. The program helped to prepare me to continue to study women and globalization issues as I work toward my PhD in Sociology.

AYAKO SAKASHITA, Japan
MAWD 2003

The days in women and development (WD) are definitely indispensable for who I am now. WD made me continue to always keep asking myself “what is happening now”, “who are involved and how involved” and “how to solve/ improve”, by which I believe my analytical and conceptualizing skills are greatly improved. With the skills and passion that I developed in WD, I am now engaged in various Japanese Official Development Assistance (ODA) endeavors.

LALAINE VIADO, MAWD 2006, worked as MDG3 Regional Coordinator for Asia, Association for Progressive Communications Women’s Networking Support Programme (APC WNSP)

I was 24 years old when i enrolled in the program (MAWD) and I badly wanted to undergo a substantial life change… maybe from being “just” a human rights activist to a human rights-feminist-activist. Call that one word a substantial makeover with my entry to MAWD. Years later I finished the degree, but I haven’t finished the business of that F word. Society is now harsher to women, oppressive elements have mutated into new forms, and patriarchy still has many faces. My degree trained me well to see in the darkness and fight back. I wanted a life change; I want society to change.

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“Pagdamay sa mga Sinalanta ng Bagyong Pedring”

“Pagdadamayan” (extending assistance) has been second nature to the constituents of the College of Social Work and Community Development (CSWCD).  Thus, when fieldwork partners KPML and ZOTO sought help for the residents of barangay Daang Hari in Navotas, devastated by typhoon Pedring, the Unit was quick to respond to the said request.    October became a busy month for the College.  Former dean, Dr. Angelito Manalili and Prof. Fermin Manalo together with Dean Rosalinda Ofreneo led the group in organizing and coordinating the disaster relief activities.  The members of the faculty, REPS, staff, students, and alumni shared whatever they could to somehow alleviate the situation of the typhoon victims.  Those who were available conducted community visits to see what the needs of the affected residents were and relief operations in the area.  Others donated and/or solicited money and goods as well as purchased and packed the needed items.

College of Social Work and Community Development